Repeater playlist #4 – female Japanese artists of the 80s & 90s

Guest post by Carl Neville:

“In putting together a brief playlist of Japanese female musicians of the 80s/90s I was surprised to discover that one of them, in fact, wasn’t a woman. Nonetheless I decided to include them simply because their work is so good. Susan appears twice, as do Midori Takada and Ichiko Hashimoto as solo artists and  members of Mkwaju Ensemble and Colored Music respectively. This is a far from comprehensive list but hopefully gives taste of some of the interesting and innovative work that went on, both Yellow Magic Orchestra related and otherwise. I claim no expertise in Japan, music or Japanese music but I am an ardent YouTube trawler and know what I like. Hopefully you will find something of interest in there too.”

Carl Neville will be publishing a novel, Resolution Way, with Repeater in May 2016. He  has an ongoing musical project – AYA – with Ayako Nikawadori (listen).  

Continue reading Repeater playlist #4 – female Japanese artists of the 80s & 90s

🐽 REPEATER PLAYLIST #3 – BAE OF PIGS SPECIAL 🐽

Piggies – The Beatles

We Are the Pigs – Suede

Pigs (Three Different Ones) – Pink Floyd

Maggie’s Farm – The Specials

All Pigs Must Die – Death in June

(h/t @spitzenprodukte)

Stand By Your Ham – Pig Aid

(a 2008 charity song made by pig farmers to raise awareness of high feed prices)

War Pigs – Black Sabbath

(h/t @allononenote)

Fascist Pig – Suicidal Tendencies

Ham n Eggs – A Tribe Called Quest

Itsu – Plaid

September (accidental) – Matthew Herbert

Papa’s Got A Brand New Pigbag – Pigbag

Piggy – Nine Inch Nails

(h/t @danielcbristow)

Dear Diary, Men Are Pigs – Finally Punk

(h/t @panthermoderns)

Pigs in Zen – Jane’s Addiction

Making Bacon – The Pork Dukes

(h/t @stevefinbow)

And, of course, Cassetteboy – Getting Piggy With It 

Smile If You Dare: Politics and Pointy Hats with the Pet Shop Boys

This is an edited extract from Smile if you Dare: Politics and Pointy Hats with the Pet Shop Boys, by Ramzy Alwakeel, which will be published by Repeater next year.

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Two decades on, there’s something implausible about Very.

The Pet Shop Boys’ fifth album snuck posthumanism and panic sex into the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. Its arrogant title said: here is our essence; an easy reference point; a convenient definition. But once you probed it, touched its bright orange case with trembling fingers, the conceit started to unravel.

You looked at the sleeve inlay and saw giant eggs, conical hats and beach balls before you spotted any human faces. Continue reading Smile If You Dare: Politics and Pointy Hats with the Pet Shop Boys

The voices disrupting white supremacy through sound – Adam Harper at The Fader

Excellent and important piece by Adam Harper at the Fader putting some of the most exciting artists currently making music into political context: 

It’s no wonder that African and Afrodiasporic artists are choosing to disseminate music in solidarity. In many cases, this creative decision is a strategy for dealing with the alienation that is so often a part of Afrodiasporic experience. As the London-based writer Kodwo Eshun puts it in his 2003 essay Further Considerations on Afrofuturism: “the condition of alienation, understood in its most general sense, is a psychosocial inevitability that all Afrodiasporic art uses to its own advantage by creating contexts that encourage a process of disalienation.” And yet in the continuing environment of white supremacy, this creativity is routinely either erased, appropriated, or confined to narrow and fetishized aesthetic areas. The music in this article—which is all linked by the multifarious connective tissues of underground culture (labels, releases, mixes, remixes, songs etc)—is not necessarily of the same belief or aesthetic, but can all be seen as resisting the supremacist paradigm in its many different ways and contexts. Often, it can be seen as exploring the way in which race intersects with gender, sexuality and/or queerness too.

Continue reading The voices disrupting white supremacy through sound – Adam Harper at The Fader

REPEATER PLAYLIST #2

#2 in an occasional series of Repeater playlists. Like #1, this is a selection of new & old tracks we’ve been listening to this month, thrown together in a list. More coherent & themed playlists/contributions from authors coming soon… 

Sleaford Mods – Faces to Faces

Shura – Just Once (MssngNo remix)

Continue reading REPEATER PLAYLIST #2

REPEATER PLAYLIST #1

The first in an occasional series of Repeater playlists. Later posts will be themed or guest-selected, but for now, a selection of old & new tracks Repeater staff have been listening to recently, shoved together in a list. With contributions from Mark Fisher, Alex Niven, Tamar Shlaim and Tariq Goddard.

Elysia Crampton – Petrichrist

Continue reading REPEATER PLAYLIST #1

Time Lapses… an extract from Robert Barry’s The Music of the Future

Time Lapses

“…indifferent to the future…”

After consuming a Ritz cracker, two Valiums, half a can of Tab, and one weak, vodka-based cocktail, a girl named Karen slips into a coma one Friday night in 1979. eighty minute hour
Seventeen years later she wakes up and the world has changed. The novel, Girlfriend in a Coma by Douglas Coupland, from 1998, shares its basic outline with the classic tale of Rip Van Winkle – or, for that matter, a great deal of the nineteenth century’s futurist literature: L’an 2440, Looking Backwards, The News from Nowhere, and countless others. But Karen doesn’t wake up in utopia. The contradictions of capitalism have not resolved themselves in her sleep. If anything, they have got worse.

“I’m not sure I completely like the new world,” she confesses to her friend Hamilton. “The whole world is only about work: work work work get get get … racing ahead … getting sacked from work … going online … knowing computer languages … winning contracts. I mean, it’s just not what I would have imagined the world might be if you’d asked me seventeen years ago. People are frazzled and angry, desperate about money, and, at best, indifferent to the future.” In the seventeen years she spent asleep, something disappeared from the world as she sees it, “‘meaning’ had vanished”.[i]

When I was at university, in the first years of the twenty-first century, it was considered practically a given that music could have no intrinsic meanings. A piece of music may be meaningful to you, or to specific social groups, in certain contexts, under certain conditions, but it does not in itself bear meaning. This notion, of music as mere “form moving in sound,” was not original when the critic Eduard Hanslick so phrased it in the midst of the 19th century’s war of the romantics. In fact, we can trace the idea at least as far back as Adam Smith’s essay, ‘Of the Nature of that Imitation which takes place in what are called the Imitative Arts’, first thrashed out in the years immediately after the publication of The Wealth of Nations made him the prophet of free market capitalism. Continue reading Time Lapses… an extract from Robert Barry’s The Music of the Future

 “Stop being afraid” – Jam City and radical politics in dance music

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Listen to Jam City’s NTS mix

I have zero time for the common refrain of middle-aged music journalists, “why is there no political music nowadays?”. It’s a question that’s lazy at best and disingenuous at worst. But, if I was going to bother to reply to someone asking that this week, I’d just ping them a link to any of Jam City’s recent interviews (if examples from rock were needed, see also Algiers or Perfect Pussy). Here’s a couple of recent excerpts:

From Complex magazine, in April:

Dream A Garden is a statement album, telling stories about emotional fallouts in the neoliberal world, the same world depicted by Classical Curves with its glossy images of luxury possessions. Is Classical Curves, Dream A Gardenbut with a certain cynicism?
Yes, absolutely. In the past, I’ve been fascinated and repulsed by the glossy surface of neoliberal capitalism: luxury products, useless electronic. But after a while, you realise that this is only the tip of the iceberg. Dream A Garden is about learning to situate those luxury images within a larger context of violence, exploitation, and depression…. Continue reading  “Stop being afraid” – Jam City and radical politics in dance music

Music, Curationism and the End of the Avant-Garde event – audio

We co-hosted an event with Pluto Press – Music, Curationism and the End of the Avant-Garde – at Brilliant Corners on 2nd May 2015. Audio is now available to stream via NTS Radio on their Mixcloud

curationism talkThe event marked the launch of David Balzer’s excellent new book, Curationism. The other participants were: Frances Morgan, deputy editor of The Wire; artist, writer and academic Salomé Voegelin; and music critic and musicologist Adam Harper.

Continue reading Music, Curationism and the End of the Avant-Garde event – audio