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Retreat: How the Counterculture Invented Wellness

£7.99£14.99

The counterculture of the Sixties and the Seventies is remembered chiefly for music, fashion, art, feminism, computing, black power, cultural revolt and the New Left. But an until-now unexplored, yet no less important aspect — both in its core identity and in terms of its ongoing significance and impact — is its relationship with health.

 

In this popular and illuminating cultural history of the relationship between health and the counterculture, Matthew Ingram connects the dots between the beats, yoga, meditation, psychedelics, psychoanalysis, Eastern philosophy, sex, and veganism, showing how the hippies still have a lot to teach us about our wellbeing.

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Matthew Ingram

Matthew Ingram is famous in his own head for throwing raves in West Africa in 1993, writing for Teletubbies, fleetingly being in The Black Dog, his cult music blog Woebot, writing for the Wire and FACT magazines, setting up the Dissensus forum and putting out a series of LPs. His "Vitamin C" animated documentary was shown at the Chicago International Children's Film Festival.

Authors

  • Matthew Ingram

    Matthew Ingram is famous in his own head for throwing raves in West Africa in 1993, writing for Teletubbies, fleetingly being in The Black Dog, his cult music blog Woebot, writing for the Wire and FACT magazines, setting up the Dissensus forum and putting out a series of LPs. His "Vitamin C" animated documentary was shown at the Chicago International Children's Film Festival.

"This richly researched archaeology of the counterculture places health at its core, showing how ideas of healing and therapy were inextricably bound up with the era’s spiritual cravings and erotic politics. Every chapter scintillates with unexpected connections and startling insights.”

Simon Reynolds, author of Rip It Up and Start Again and Energy Flash

”A rich tapestry of mind-altering influences of the counterculture that shaped our aspirations. Enjoy the ride. I did.”

Patrick Holford, author of The Optimum Nutrition Bible

“What a ride! Matthew Ingram takes us with him on an intentional journey through the history and geography of the counterculture’s contribution to modern ideas of wellness. Neither simplistic debunker nor gullible seeker, Ingram never fails to entertain and inform as he demonstrate the very real contribution made by ‘alternative’ ideas and practices to much of what we all now take for granted about the nature of health and the self, and much that we could all still benefit from learning. A huge range of interviews, intelligent analysis and concise, sympathetic observation make this a compulsively readable but also impressively erudite account of this endlessly fascinating subject.”

Jeremy Gilbert, author of Twenty-First Century Socialism
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